Wanderlust

Claire noya.
21.
Indonesian/Moluccan/Dutch.
California
fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian man cries at the site of his house, which was destroyed by Israeli shelling, in Beit Hanoun, Gaza on July 26, 2014. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian man cries at the site of his house, which was destroyed by Israeli shelling, in Beit Hanoun, Gaza on July 26, 2014. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

We would be together and have our books and at night be warm in bed together with the windows open and the stars bright.

Ernest Hemingway

Everything you love is here

(via lovequotesrus)

(Source: kitty-en-classe, via lovequotesrus)

acosmist - One who believes that nothing exists
paralian - A person who lives near the sea
aureate - Pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - To wander about deliriously
sabaism - The worship of stars
dysphoria - An unwell feeling
aubade - A love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - Happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - To speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

(Source: milkthistles, via petrichour)

smithsonian:

Today in 1944: American troops land at Omaha Beach for the invasion of Normandy, France, known as D-Day. Robert Capa was one of two magazine war correspondents allowed to join the U.S. troops landing on the shores of Normandy. Dodging bullets and hiding behind pieces of steel, Capa photographed for hours in waist-deep water with several cameras. His hands trembled, and he ruined many rolls of film as he tried to change film amid the dead and wounded of the battle. His photos were sent directly to the offices of LIFE in London for processing. Hurrying to develop the rolls, a technician turned up the heat in the dryers, ruining many of the 72 images taken. Only 11 survived.
More from our Museum of American History

smithsonian:

Today in 1944: American troops land at Omaha Beach for the invasion of Normandy, France, known as D-Day. Robert Capa was one of two magazine war correspondents allowed to join the U.S. troops landing on the shores of Normandy. 

Dodging bullets and hiding behind pieces of steel, Capa photographed for hours in waist-deep water with several cameras. His hands trembled, and he ruined many rolls of film as he tried to change film amid the dead and wounded of the battle. 

His photos were sent directly to the offices of LIFE in London for processing. Hurrying to develop the rolls, a technician turned up the heat in the dryers, ruining many of the 72 images taken. Only 11 survived.

More from our Museum of American History

(via historicaltimes)

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by night

"When the night comes, the starry sky reflects on its surface like in a mirror, and you have the feeling of being in space."

(Source: tsumetaiyozora, via langleav)